Posts Tagged: xtracycle


9
Jun 2014
by mark

How to attach a Burley Piccolo to an Xtracycle

Xtracycle cargo bikes and Burley Piccolo Trailercycles are both great for family biking. Unfortunately, there’s currently no ready-made way to attach a Burley Piccolo to an Xtracycle.

Fortunately, Greg from Beehive Bicycles published photos online of a custom solution he developed. I found and mimicked an early solution that I created for this.

It worked like this: I started with the provided Moose rack, and use a hack saw to cut it down to just the essential part that was needed to connect to the Piccolo.

Here you can see a finished photo of Greg’s design that I followed:

IMG_4786.JPG

I made the remaining “feet” of the hacked rack as short as possible so that the Piccolo bolt could go all the way through, without interference from the Flightdeck.

Then, two more holes were drilled into the Continue reading →


9
Mar 2012
by mark

Carrying a stroller on a cargo bike

There are a few options carrying a stroller on a cargo bike. The
simplest options is do without. Perhaps a sling will do. If the stroller
is to be used primarily on lightly used sidewalks, a bicycle with a
child on it could be pushed along instead.

Sometimes my wife would go shopping at the Farmer’s Market in this
manner, pushing a bakfiets through the market with the child on it:

rainy day farmer's market trip

I hope for the day when our local market is too crowded for that to be feasible.

Before I get to the solutions that do work, I’ll share one attempt at putting a stroller on a bakfiets that didn’t work:

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26
Feb 2011
by mark

Electric Cargo Bike as Grocery Getter

Grocery Trip

  • Two 45 Gallon Totes by Sterlite + the Go Getter bag provide 340 liters of hauling volume
  • Up to 300 lbs of cargo reasonably hauled (in addition to the rider)
  • Bar mitts keep hands warm without bulky gloves or mittens
  • Schwable Winter Marathon carbide-studded tires for traction on ice
  • Electric system provides up to 20 mph of assist reliably for 20 continous miles (longer if you pedal more)
  • Much less effort getting up hills, even with a load.
  • Bright front and rear LED lights are powered by pedaling if battery fails
  • Super-stable double-sided kickstand
  • Recharges overnight in the garage for pennies

We’re able to haul more stuff further, faster, with less effort and greater comfort than ever before (like loads of recycled computers, or two children and camping gear). Compared to the alternative of having a second car, the system more than pays for itself.

My electric Yuba Mundo was built and sold by Cycle 9. Trailer by Bikes at Work is expandable to 8 feet for longer loads, like couches. Combining this trailer with this bike currently requires a bit of custom welding.


22
Jan 2011
by mark

DIY battery box for electric Yuba Mundo

boring photo of a 36v 15Ah battery in a Granite Gear Armored Pocketboring photo of a 36v 15Ah battery in a Granite Gear Armored Pocket

I’m trying out a new battery box for our electric Yuba Mundo.

I used the weather-resistant compact file tote from OfficeMax. Inside I’ve placed our 36V 15Ah battery from Cycle9.com, which has first been padded in Granite Gear armored pocket. The padded battery fits snugly at the bottom of the box. Perfect!

The box has small handles, and I used this area to cut a small hole with a utility knife for the battery wire to come through. This placement means water would have to be going up to get into the box, so I’m expecting no rain and very little road spray could make in it there. ( Adding drain holes to the bottom could also be a good idea, just in case. )

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19
Dec 2010
by mark

Emundo vs bakfiets for winter kid and cargo cycling

eMundo with trailer, bar mitts on greenway
The electric Yuba Mundo works well asa kid & cargo winter bike. Recently I’ve been trying out Bar Mitts which so far seem to very effective at keeping my hands warmer while allowing me to wear thinner gloves inside of them. Compared to the bakfiets, the child needs to be dressed notably warmer. Since this photo was taken, we’ve also gotten some child ski goggles for her as well. In sum, we’re able to make cross-town trips comfortable at 15F (-9.4C) which is about as cold as it gets here in Richmond, Indiana.

The bakfiets makes it easier to keep the child warm with the greenhouse-like canopy, and the fully enclosed chain guard is definitely a plus for the bakfiets– On the eMundo the drive train got clogged with frozen slush in just about 15 minutes on a cold day– it was easy to clean out a little later with a stick, but no fun– plus the eMundo chain will need to be cleaned more after getting wet.

However, what the eMundo has going for it is a motor which allows me to get places faster and spend less time outside on very cold days. For that reason I currently prefer the eMundo to the bakfiets for most winter uses. The Mundo’s electric motor smoothed over the problem with the slush– while pedaling became “chunky” due to that issue, the motor could pull me along just fine without pedaling anyway.

Here’s same scene in a bakfiets from the previous winter:
box biking at 10F


24
Nov 2010
by mark

Missed the Bus

Missed the bus
J. missed the bus to high school today, and I was tasked with getting the girls to school and daycare on time.

With temperatures in the upper 20s, we piled on to the electric-assisted Yuba Mundo and headed out. For this trip we dressed the toddler more aggressively to block the wind generated from the bike’s speed. Her commuting clothes included a winter helmet with built-in ear covers, a balaclava, mittens over gloves, snow pants and a winter coat. She reported that nothing was cold when we arrived at daycare about 15 minutes later.
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16
Oct 2010
by mark

Hauling a large load of e-waste by e-bike

Hauling a large load of e-waste on the Yuba Mundo
Today I hauled between 600 and 800 pounds of e-waste from the hardware co-op at church to the annual e-waste recycling event hosted at Earlham College and serviced by RecycleForce.

To haul that volume by bike, I used this Yuba Mundo with an 18 gallon container strapped to each side-loader racks along with this Bikes-at-Work trailer. On the trailer I’ve stacked a 45 gallon container and a 36 gallon container.
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21
Jul 2010
by don

Yuba elMundo Questions and Answers

 

June 7, 2010

Dear Yuba,

Hi.  My name is Don, and I write a blog about electrically-assisted cargo bikes.  Although I’m pleased with the performance of my Rans Hammer Truck and BionX motor, many of my readers are interested in less expensive alternatives.  The Yuba elMundo and Kona Electric Ute are two possibilities I’ve mentioned in my blog.  Unfortunately, there isn’t a lot of information available on the web to help prospective buyers make an informed purchasing decision.  To help fill the void, I was able to arrange a test ride of the Ute, and I posted a fairly detailed review here: http://mycargobike.net/2010/06/15/first-look-at-the-kona-electric-ute/

Sadly, I haven’t been able to find a Yuba dealer in my area to test the elMundo.  I don’t know anyone who owns an elMundo with whom I can correspond.  Lacking first- or second-hand experience, I’m hoping you can answer some of my questions to help me and my readers understand where the elMundo fits in the assisted cargo bike marketplace.  With your permission, I would like to post this letter and your responses on my blog within the next couple of weeks.

Your website provides a brief description of the elMundo, several photos, and a tantalizing price for a bike in this category.  I’m especially excited to see a lithium ion battery and a 750W hub motor.  However, there are few details for those of us who obsess over such things.  For example, who makes the motor?  How did you decide it was a good match for your bike?  Does it have internal gearing to help deliver good torque at low speeds?

Besides the low price, there is a significant advantage of having a motor integrated by the bike manufacturer (as opposed to an after-market build like my bike).  Customers will assume that the manufacturer has carefully matched the capabilities of the bike and motor.  The manufacturer will analyze loads and stresses to enhance the reliability of the product.  The bike will be tested under strenuous conditions, and a single warranty will cover both the bike and the motor.  Can you assure us that this analysis and testing has been done on the elMundo, and can you provide details regarding your warranty?

Yuba elMundo

The Yuba Mundo is rated to carry loads of up to 400 pounds, excluding the rider.  Since there is nothing to the contrary on the web page for the elMundo, I assume that the weight limit is the same.  With the help of that powerful motor, it will now be possible for people to carry some pretty heavy loads up an incline.  Of course, what goes up must come down.  That’s why I was surprised to see only rim brakes in your photos of the elMundo.  From my perspective, that seems a little risky.  I know disc brakes are now an option on the Mundo.  Are they also available for the elMundo, or does the hub motor preclude the possibility of a front disc rotor?

It also seems possible that your motor is likely to produce new stresses on the front fork that didn’t exist on the non-electric bike.  Have you made any modifications to strengthen the fork?

Finally, I’m curious how much the elMundo weighs.  Is the battery removable for remote charging, and can you also charge it on the bike?  How long does it take to fully recharge?  Do you have any estimates regarding the lifetime of the battery and motor?

If you have any customers who would be willing to share their thoughts and experiences on this bike, I would love to talk to them.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Thanks,

Don


July 7, 2010

Hello Don,

Great to hear from you.  I have visited your blog many times before and I did find the content extremely interesting, your analysis and opinions are well documented. Also this is the first email we are getting from you asking questions about the elMundo.

If you were interested we could put you in touch with a few users of the elMundo Cargo Bike, these users are mostly in the Bay Area. Also one our dealer Cycle9 specializes in electric bikes and cargo bikes and has supplied electric Mundos to a numerous customers. One of them Mark Strosberg has been commenting on your blog, he purchased his Mundo from Cycle9.

Currently the elMundo is a Mundo Cargo Bike frame with an after market electric kit installed on the bike. So a lot of the questions your are asking can’t really be answered since it seems that many customers are riding electric Mundos with different motors or battery packs. The model supplied by us integrates a battery placed between the rack and the seat stays, it is removable but doesn’t need to be removed to be charged.

The motor is made by Aoetema, we have tested various combinations of motors and like this specific 750W version for many reasons one of them being the torque it gets for hill climbing.

The 36V LiPO4 battery offers about 20 miles of charge on flat terrain. Motor, battery, controller are under warranty for a year.

We do ship the elMundo with disc brakes installed on the rear (although it doesn’t show on the pictures!).

We have no doubts that the Mundo bike is the best platform for an electric Cargo Bike in the market place due to the strength and solidity of the Hi-ten steel frame. So the elMundo can take the rider, the loads, the passengers and the electric assist.

The battery can be removed and the current combinations gives a range of about 15-25 miles depending on the conditions and terrain.

Let me know if you have further questions or comments.

Ben


After this email exchange, I asked Yuba further questions about the weight of the bike and clarifications regarding the warranty, but I haven’t received a reply.  If or when I do, I will post their answers.

Yuba’s first response was a bit of a mixed bag, from my perspective.  I’m happy to hear the elMundo now comes with a rear disc brake.  This seems to be a fairly recent development, and it’s a welcome step in the right direction.  However, it doesn’t alleviate my concerns about stopping this bike when it’s carrying a load.  Stopping distances for cargo bikes in general is a topic I hope to investigate in the future.

The Hi-ten steel frame of the Yuba is an interesting feature compared to the aluminum frames of the Ute and the Hammer Truck.  It is heavier, of course, but steel will bend under stress rather than break.  If you’re contemplating moving heavy loads on a cargo bike, that might be important to consider.  But in that case, remember to test those brakes and upgrade them if you need to.

Although I have no experience with the Aoetema motor, the reviews I’ve found on the web have been mostly favorable.  It appears to be a reasonable choice for this bike.  However, it sounds like Yuba views the motor as an after-market product, so I’m guessing they would refer you to Aoetema if you had any warranty issues.  This negates one of the advantages I was hoping would come from an integrated product.  When you buy a car, you get a single warranty that covers the whole car.  You don’t have to go to different companies to deal with motor issues, frame problems, etc.

The one year motor/battery/controller warranty is okay, but only half the duration of the BionX warranty.

Although the elMundo remains an interesting option in the electric cargo bike market, I’m hesitant to recommend it without trying it.  Ben didn’t give me hope that I would get a chance to do that any time soon.  If I could find a Yuba dealer in Seattle, I’m betting they wouldn’t have an elMundo ready to ride.  Like Kona, Yuba seems reluctant to vigorously pursue this market.  I would love to know whether that is due to technical issues, or if these companies are skeptical about the size of the market.  In either case, the cargo bike revolution is off to a very leisurely start in America.


18
Jul 2010
by larry

My Solar Bicycle

I am anticipating peoples’ reactions:

“Why do you have solar panels on your bicycle?”

“What do you do when it rains?”

“Can the solar panel drive the electric motor directly?”

“Did you make it yourself?”

“What the…”

Allow me to explain. My vehicle of choice is a “stoked Xtracycle”. (For those of you not “in the know”, an Xtracycle is a type of cargo bike that has an extra long frame. And “stoked” means that my bike has a Stokemonkey electric motor that helps me out on the hills.) In general this summer I’ve been biking 10 to 20 miles a day and then recharging my battery overnight by simply plugging it into an outlet. However, next week I’m going on a 3-day 240-mile camping trip through the Adirondacks where I might not have access to an outlet. The solar panels will help extend the range of my bicycle. So to answer your questions:

“Why do you have solar panels on your bicycle?”

I use them to extend the range of my electric cargo bike for long trips (plus they were fun to make). I will carry two batteries on my trip, each giving my bike a range of 20 to 40 miles. On a sunny day the solar panels can recharge one of the batteries while I am riding, adding an additional 20 to 40 miles for a total range of 60 to 120 miles a day. I anticipate some hills and I’ll be carrying a load, so a 60-mile range is probably more accurate. I may need to pedal the last few miles on some days.

“What do you do when it’s cloudy or it rains?”

I plan to stay in a hotel some of the time and recharge my batteries there.

“Can the solar panel drive the electric motor directly?”

Not really. The solar panels don’t produce enough electricity instantaneously. For example the solar panels only produce about 40 watts of power at a given moment, whereas my bicycle needs about 400 watts of power to go up a hill. The main purpose of the solar panels is to charge the battery over time.  Since charging happens slowly, 40 watts is enough to charge the battery. It takes roughly 10 hours of charging to store one to two hours’ worth of electrified riding time in the battery. And one to two hours of riding translates into 15 to 30 miles.

“Did you make it yourself?”

I already had the stoked Xtracycle, which is described on my About This Bike page. As you can read there, an electric cargo bike can be had for $1000 to $3500. And I had already constructed the canopy frame for a previous project, the Bike Wagon Canopy ($150). I found the canopy was somewhat wobbly with the weight of the solar panels so I had to strengthen it with guy wires. It remained for me to add the solar panels and the electronics. I used maritime-grade solar panels that were designed to keep sailboat starter batteries charged up, so they are extra-sturdy and consequently somewhat expensive. I’ve since seen panels with almost twice the power at 3/4 the price. Cost of panels: $900 to $1200. I am using three 12-volt panels in series to produce the 36 volts required by my battery. I spent a lot of time researching what sorts of electronics I would need between the panels and the battery, and finally concluded that I can just plug the panels into the battery directly. (I plan to write more about this in a later post.)

Total cost for a solar bicycle: $2050 to $4850. Not bad for a vehicle that can get you both out of the car and off the grid.


20
Jun 2010
by mark

20 miles of errands with an electric cargo bike

yard sales with an electric Yuba Mundo

Today’s milestone was our first family trip to Lowe’s by bike. While I have no special love for this big box store, it’s sells some things we can’t find elsewhere in town. It’s also located on the farthest edge of Richmond, nestled next to a interstate exchange and the typical sprawl of chain businesses and parking lots that accompanies them.

None the less, we found routes there and back that involved minimal time of busy roads, arriving in 18 minutes*. In total, we rode about another 20 in-town miles today running typical errands. Again this seemed very reasonable on the electric cargo bike, and a workout on my fast recumbent to keep up.
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